Endodontics

Endodontics

Endodontics

Our Solutions and Services

Root Canal Therapy

According to the American Association of Endodontists, root canal therapy is the most feared dental procedure of all. Despite this stigma, root canal therapy is actually a pain-free, quick and relatively comfortable procedure. In fact, it relieves your pain and can prevent more complicated oral issues down the road.

A root canal is a term used to describe the natural cavity in the center of a tooth. This area contains a soft area known as the pulp chamber that houses the nerves. If this area becomes irritated or infected due to cavities, trauma or decay, root canal therapy is necessary. If left untreated, the infection can cause an abscess, which can lead to swelling of the face and neck and bone loss around the roots of teeth.

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Oral Trauma

Endodontists specialize in oral trauma and are often able to save teeth that have been injured in accidents or sports-related activities.  Traumatic injuries include root fractures as well as teeth that have been chipped, dislodged, or completely knocked-out and should be seen immediately by an endodontist.

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Internal Bleaching

Internal bleaching treatment is recommended after a tooth undergoes staining from within the tooth itself. Typically, this is due to a structural defect within the tooth, a dying tooth, or because blood and other bodily fluids penetrated the tooth during prior root canal treatment. Regardless of the cause, it's possible to restore such a tooth to match the color of its adjacent teeth by bleaching the tooth from the inside-out – a process known as internal tooth bleaching.

For more information on internal bleaching contact our office at 904-329-3371.

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Cracked Teeth

Whether your tooth has cracked due to an injury or general wear and tear, you can experience a variety of symptoms ranging from erratic pain when you chew your food to sudden pain when your tooth is exposed to very hot or cold temperatures. 

There are many different types of cracked teeth. The treatment and outcome for your tooth depend on the type, location, and extent of the crack. The sooner your tooth is treated, the better the outcome. Once treated most cracked teeth continue to function as they should, for many years of pain-free biting and chewing.

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Apicoectomy

Apicoectomy is a surgical procedure to remove infected tissue from the area surrounding a tooth's root tip (known as the "apex") and allow proper healing to occur following a root canal treatment.  Unlike other procedures, an apicoectomy preserves the strength of the tooth.

Your teeth are held in place by roots that extend into your jawbone. Front teeth usually have one root. Other teeth, such as your premolars and molars, have two or more roots. The tip or end of each root is called the apex. Nerves and blood vessels enter the tooth through the apex. Sometimes, even after root canal treatment, infected tissue can remain. This can prevent healing or cause re-infection later. In a surgical procedure called an apicoectomy, the root tip, or apex, is removed along with the infected tissue. A filling is then placed to seal the end of the root.

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